Wild Burro Rescue and Preservation Project
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Frequently Asked Questions PDF Print E-mail

burros1. Why do you rescue wild burros, when they should be roaming free and happy?

To the park service, burros are not free-roaming, but non-native, which to them, means they have to be eradicated.  We do not agree with that assessment, but we can not change it.  Therefore, our sanctuary is the only safe place for them.

2. Why doesn’t the government intervene and help out the burros?           

The Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act in 1971 gave authority to the Bureau of Land Management (BLM)  to make their own policy toward mustangs and burros.  Their policy is to eliminate wild burros and mustangs from the land, and transport them to a confined area, that is, if they don’t die in the process.

3. Where are you located, and can you describe the terrain of the sanctuary?

The sanctuary is located in Olancha, CA.  It is located in the High Sierras where the sagebrush meets the pine. 

4. What is your climate like at the sanctuary?

The temperature fluctuates quite a bit in the summer, it’s between 50 and 110 degrees.  In the winter, it can go down to 10 and up to 80 degrees, and the wind gusts can reach up to 100 miles per hour.

5. Why is your sanctuary in Olancha, CA?

It is this terrain and climate in which the wild burro thrives.  Also, our sanctuary is close to Death Valley National Park, and close to other places the last wild burros call home, where they had lived peacefully for nearly 400 years.

Old Burro6. What is the life expectancy of a burro?

40-50 years, sometimes longer.

7. Why doesn’t the sanctuary enlarge the corrals for the burros?

We would love to, but panels and material would cost thousands of dollars, and we just don’t have the funds at this time.  Simply put, we have no financial reserves.

8. Why did the sanctuary adopt a cow?

One day, the local ranchers were herding cattle up the mountains in the Spring.  The cattle were grazing in the Sierras, and on public land, very close to our sanctuary.  While this was all happening, a calf was born.  Our board member was deeply saddened when he found out this calve’s mother died, while trying to give birth to her and her sister, making her the only survivor.  So, he purchased her, and named her Orphan Annie aka Bessie.  Wild Burro Rescue took her in, and now she’s part of the pack, living with burros and loving her life.   

9. Why should we call in advance when we want to visit the sanctuary?

Because Diana is very busy and constantly active to achieve new successes for the burro rescue.  She values your time and is eager to dedicate hers to you when you come to visit and she wants to make sure that she is there to welcome you. That is why you should call in advance when visiting.  Or take the chance of standing in front of a closed gate.  And who wants that?

 
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